Category Archives: depreciation

Is it now possible to imagine Australia having a national affordable housing strategy, backed by funding, by the end of 2016.

At the National Housing Conference last week, there was considerable optimism about the newly appointed federal minister for cities, Jamie Briggs, whose infrastructure mandate includes housing. New energy is coming from the states with the largest affordable housing deficits – a social housing initiative from the New South Wales government and a “refreshed” metropolitan planning strategy in Melbourne with a stronger emphasis on affordable housing.

It is now possible to imagine Australia having a national affordable housing strategy, backed by funding, by the end of 2016.

Australia certainly needs such a strategy. The population is projected to reach 38 million in the next 35 years. Sydney and Melbourne are each expected to grow by at least three million people. The proportion of older people will be higher, with a lower proportion in the paid workforce.

This means we need at least six million new housing units in the next three decades. There is increasing impetus to locate these dwellings close to public transport, employment clusters and health and social services.

Cost pressures are intensifying

Rising housing demand and prices affect everyone, but low-income renters have fared worst in recent years. Capital city rents rose by twice the level of inflation from 2005 to 2010. By 2011, the shortage of suitable rental properties exceeded 500,000.

As a result, even most households that receive Commonwealth Rent Assistance (projected to cost A$6.6 billion in 2015-16) pay well over the recommended maximum rent. Some 55% of the A$7.7 billion annual cost to the government of capital gains exemptions and negative gearing goes to the top 10% of income earners. Only 4% goes to the bottom 20% of households by income.

Existing programs are not accomplishing policy aims. The Abbott government discontinued two small national programs, the Social Housing Initiative co-funding construction of non-profit housing and the National Rental Affordability Scheme subsidising below-market rental housing. No national strategy or infrastructure funding program has replaced those small but important initiatives.

Key steps towards affordability

What would be the basic elements of a national affordable housing strategy? Economist David Rosen led a review of the US$7 trillion spent in the US on federal finance, tax, lending, spending and regulatory programs and policies. According to Rosen, the place to start is a standard definition of “affordable housing”.

Malcolm Turnbull’s appointment of a cities minister, Jamie Briggs, has raised hopes of action on developing a national affordable housing strategy. AAP/Lukas Coch

The next step would be to calculate current and projected need for affordable housing by subtracting housing need from the available stock. There are local efforts to calculate this in cities like Melbourne, but it would need to be done in a consistent way across the country.

The cost of owning or renting a home includes rent or mortgage payments, property taxes and unit maintenance. A household can also incur onerous transport costs, if living far from employment and good public transport. Internationally, affordability is usually defined as housing that costs no more than 30-35% of household income, adjusted for household size.

For households earning less than 30% of their area’s median income, private market housing will almost certainly be out of reach without some form of subsidy.

In metropolitan Melbourne, for instance, the average weekly income is A$1333. A little over 11% of households in the city (159,000 households) earn less than A$400 a week, which is 30% of the median income. These households could only afford to pay a maximum of A$133 a week on the rent or mortgage. Less than 1% of rentals in Melbourne are available at those prices.

Social housing constitutes less than 3% of total housing stock. Most of it is occupied by these low-income households. So, at the most basic level, affordable housing would seek to fill that shortfall of more than 150,000 units in one major city alone, as well as building for future affordable housing needs.

How do we fund affordable housing?

After calculating need, the next requirement for a national affordable housing strategy would be to identify all potential revenue sources to fund it. These could be direct funding from national, state and local governments, but also indirect funding through tax rebates, low- or no-cost land, or mechanisms like reduced parking requirements or expedited planning approvals (which cuts land-holding costs and uncertainties).

A plethora of mechanisms used in other countries could be adopted here. For instance, in the US the Low Income Housing Tax Credit has, since 1986, allowed private investors to obtain tax credits in return for a ten-year investment in constructing or rehabilitating low-income rental housing. The stable and bipartisan program injects about US$6 billion a year in capital into affordable housing.

If a small proportion of the negative gearing tax credit were re-allocated towards investment in social housing, a similarly scaled program could be instituted in Australia. Similarly, if the Commonwealth guaranteed a 6% return on social housing investment, how much of the A$2 trillionheld in superannuation funds could be unlocked?

For the past two years, the Transforming Housing project has brought together state and local government, private developers, community housing providers and commercial and philanthropic investors to identify barriers to scaling up affordable housing in metropolitan Melbourne and how to overcome them.

Much of the emphasis has been on mechanisms at a state and local level, ranging from value capture financing to innovative design and construction. However, there is growing consensus that a Commonwealth affordable housing strategy is essential to enable integrated action by other levels of government and the private and charitable sectors.

With a clear sense of the numbers around affordable housing need and a stable financing and renewal model, the Turnbull government could reap multiple co-benefits. A national strategy could make cities more liveable, stimulate the property and construction sector, and reduce healthcare costs. The private and charitable sectors are waiting to swing into action.


This article was co-authored by: Dr David Rosen, principal of DRA Associates and an advisor on development, finance and policy; Rob Pradolin, general manager of business development for Frasers Property Australia; Catherine Brown, CEO of the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation; and Dr Heather Holst, deputy CEO and director of services and housing for Launch Housing.

FREE RENT & SALE APPRAISALS

Our goal is simple: to provide the greatest possible net operating income, while continually enhancing the value of the asset. We believe in using proven and new strategies and continually looking for new ways to provide cost savings for the property and the owner Our vision To provide a flexible and all-encompassing management service for our customers' properties and assets. Our values Exceptional customer service.  Transparency, punctuality and reliability.

Leave a comment

Filed under Affordable Land, Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS Building Approvals February January, Australian Properties, Brisbane Inner City, depreciation, empowerment, family, Foreign Investment, Fredericks Homes, LJ Gilland Real Estate Pty Ltd, ljgrealestate, Property Investment, Property Law, Property Management & Sales, QUEENSLAND, renovating construction maintenance investment property rentals sales tenants, SINO CHINA AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC TRADE INFRASTRUCTURE REALESTATE FOREIGN INVESTMENT

Five of the major regions throughout Queensland are experiencing steady improvements in median house values.

The Sunshine State is establishing its growth potential according to data released by the Real Estate Institute of Queensland (REIQ).

“This report supports the REIQ’s long-held view that those areas of Queensland that have been doing well are continuing to do well,” according to Antonia Mercorella, CEO of the REIQ.

Brisbane is the fastest-selling area in the state with average days on market at 57 – a drop of eight days compared to a year ago.

Brisbane median house values have also risen 1.6 per cent over the March quarter, which along with Toowoomba reflects the state’s the highest quarterly increase.

The capital city’s proportion of profit-making sales increased three per cent in the year to reflect 96 per cent.

Toowoomba holds the state’s record, however, with 98 per cent of all houses sold recording a profit for the vendor.

Mercorella says Queensland is in the grip of steady, sustainable growth, although some regionals are in a recovery phase.

“Those areas that are struggling to recover from the resources downturn are still trying to stabilize,” she says.

“But what we don’t have is the start of another boom and bust cycle, which as we all know by now, doesn’t really benefit anyone in the long-term.”

Five of the major regions throughout Queensland are experiencing steady improvements in median house values.

Brisbane, the Gold and Sunshine coasts, Toowoomba and Cairns, all showed rising annual median house values of approximately 1.5 to 1.9 per cent on average each quarter over the past year.

Gladstone’s median house values rose by 0.8 per cent, which is the city’s first positive move in five quarters.

The rate of decline in Mackay’s median values appears to be slowing with a drop of one per cent to its annual median value in the March quarter.

In addition, Townsville’s median house values rose 0.7 per cent, and its proportion of profit-making sales has remained stable at 74 per cent since August last year.

SEE ALSO RENTAL MARKET EXCERPT FW: http://wp.me/p2zAfd-2l8

Our goal is simple: to provide the greatest possible net operating income, while continually enhancing the value of the asset. We believe in using proven and new strategies and continually looking for new ways to provide cost savings for the property and the owner Our vision To provide a flexible and all-encompassing management service for our customers' properties and assets. Our values Exceptional customer service.  Transparency, punctuality and reliability.

Leave a comment

Filed under Affordable Land, Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS Building Approvals February January, Australian Properties, Brisbane Inner City, depreciation, empowerment, family, Foreign Investment, LJ Gilland Real Estate Pty Ltd, ljgrealestate, Property Investment, Property Law, Property Management & Sales, QUEENSLAND

Too many property investors are missing out on important cash flow by neglecting depreciation

Many property investors are missing out on beneficial depreciation tax claims. The annoying thing is how often this happens, when it really doesn’t need to happen at all!

Tax depreciation is often an overlooked method of obtaining tax deductions on investment properties. It is a big help in enabling investors to minimise their tax liability and improve their cash flow. Sadly though, we often see situations where depreciation either isn’t maximised to its fullest potential, or worse yet, overlooked entirely.

The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) recognises that the value of capital assets reduces over time as they approach the end of their effective life. These assets can be written off as a tax deduction ie. ‘depreciation’.

What depreciation should I be considering?
If you own an investment property (new or old, large or small), two areas of depreciation are available:

1. plant and equipment
2. capital works on the building

Different items within a rental property have different rates of depreciation based on the effective life of the item. These items are identified by certified quantity surveyors, who inspect the property assets and then calculate its depreciation through their expertise and knowledge of which items are depreciable and how savings can be achieved.

To claim maximum tax benefits on an investment property the ATO encourages property investors to obtain a fully compliant tax depreciation report prepared by a certified quantity surveyor. You or your accountant will use this report when preparing your income tax return.

Further, some property investors may not realise that they don’t have to wait all year to benefit from the depreciation deductions available to them. Instead, they can improve their cash flow throughout the year simply by nominating to use a Pay As You Go (PAYG) withholding variation.

A PAYG withholding variation allows individuals to vary the amount of tax withheld by their employer in each pay to anticipate their tax liabilities. This means that they can take advantage of the deductions available to them regularly, rather than waiting until the end of a financial year for their tax refund. You should speak to your accountant about this.

When to obtain a property depreciation report

Ideally, a depreciation report should be obtained soon after the purchase of an investment property. This enables a quantity surveyor to separate the items included in the purchase price, from the expenses that will be incurred by the new owner in the future. This detailed analysis ensures the maximum investment property depreciation allowances can be claimed.

A depreciation report is critical documentary evidence required by the ATO to support any tax deductions for components of an investment property that are decreasing in value. All investment properties are eligible to have their assets depreciated where, generally speaking, construction costs are incurred after 18 July 1985 and structural improvements are incurred after 27 February 1992. This applies even if the previous owner paid for the construction. In the event that the original construction cost data is no longer available, the ATO stipulates that a quantity surveyor must assess this figure.

Where to start – immediate tax depreciation write-offs and the low value pool

Obtaining independent, professional property advice ensures investment property owners stay up to date with the intricacies of tax legislation and can make well-informed decisions that enhance cash flow. For instance, waiting until just before the close of the financial year to buy an asset for an investment property may entitle you to claim the full cost on your tax return for that year. For example, plant and equipment assets valued at $300 or less are generally able to be written off at 100 per cent in the financial year of acquisition.

Moreover, under the Low Value Pool Regulations, certain items can be depreciated more quickly. Items that enter the pool are depreciated at a set rate or 18.75 per cent in the first year but in subsequent years, the percentage rate of depreciation jumps up to 37.5 per cent on the diminishing total.

What can effective property depreciation save you?

In typical situations – say a commercial property investment of around $1,000,000 – using a quantity surveyor and well-prepared depreciation report can result in clear benefits. Potential tax deductions under a well-planned depreciation schedule could total in excess of $27,000 in the first year of claim and over $100,000 for a 10-year period following the purchase of the property. For an individual taxpayer on the top marginal tax rate of 49.5 per cent (2014/2015 individual tax rate), the tax saving would be $13,365 on a $27,000 tax claim.

Of course, depreciation is only one component of owning an investment property and the associated tax deductions. Other deductions could include:

• fees to property management agencies (SEE WHAT WE CHARGE VRS WHAT OTHERS CHARGE http://wp.me/p1qS3N-7YJ
• repairs and maintenance to the property and its fixtures (IMPORTANT INFORMATION TO NOTE:-

AT A GLANCE

  • Property Management & the Sales of Properties with tenants in place
  • Individual solutions to fit our client’s needs
  • Body corporate management
  • Competitive Commission Rates (CONTACT US FOR DETAILS)
  • LET FEE FOR REFERRALS, We are a business built on 20 years of Referrals.
  • NO Lease Renewal & Comparable Market Analysis’ Fees/Charges
  • PHOTOS TAKEN ON ENTRY, tenants are shown about safety switches and water mains etc.  We meet all tenants on site.

                Hands on approach to all Property Investment Management Matters
• interest payments on mortgages over the property
• council and water rates
• property insurances  * smoke alarm compliance *Terri Scheer Landlords Insurance

The total deductions can be considerable and go a very long way to improving your tax bill at the end of the financial year and throughout your years of investment in the property.

Clearly, there’s a real advantage in obtaining a depreciation report on your investment property. Our recommendation is to make sure you have a good depreciation strategy, but consult your accountant and other advisers before you finalise this!

Leave a comment

Filed under ACT Canberra Australia, Affordable Land, Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS Building Approvals February January, Australian Properties, Brisbane Inner City, depreciation, empowerment, family, Foreign Investment, LJ Gilland Real Estate Pty Ltd, ljgrealestate, Property Investment, Property Law, Property Management & Sales, QUEENSLAND, renovating construction maintenance investment property rentals sales tenants, SINO CHINA AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC TRADE INFRASTRUCTURE REALESTATE FOREIGN INVESTMENT, Spring Hill Bowen Hills Fortitude Valley South Brisbane East Brisbane